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20120901
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jesse aryee carl asaro michael asciak michael edward asher janice marie ashley thomas j. ashton manuel o. asitimbay gregg arthur atlas gerald t. atwood james audiffred louis frank aversano, jr. ezra aviles sandy ayala arlene t. babakitis eustace p. bacchus john j. badagliacca jane ellen baeszler robert j. baierwalter andrew j. bailey brett t. bailey tatyana bakalinskaya michael s. baksh sharon m. balkcom michael andrew bane katherine bantis and my uncle, all this punishes that my brother missed meeting by 10 days. even though i didn't get to meet him, i really feel like i know him because my family talks about him a lot. he was a happy, fun loving, caring, proud american. who loves sailing, and skiing just like i do. i think them every time i see 9/11. we miss you and love you always. >> and my uncle john list and my aunt, so the snp are so. gerard baptiste walter baran gerard a. barbara paul vincent barbaro james william barbella ivan kyrillos f. barbosa victor daniel barbosa colleen ann barkow matthew barnes melissa rose barnes sheila patricia barnes evan j. baron renee barrett-arjune
to hear from you. e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. >>> up next on book tv, carl bogus recalls a personal and professional life of political commentator william f. buckley jr.. the author examines mr. buckley's efforts to shape the conservative movement in the 1950's and his lasting impact on conservative leaders like ronald reagan. it's about 45 minutes. >> thank you all for coming to books and books shot and killed supporting peery [applause] >> we have a very special guest here for you today. he's a professor at roger williams university. he spoke in front of congress and his writings have been published in the nation, usa today and the "boston globe" and he is here to discuss the latest book, "buckley." please help me in welcoming mr. carl bogus. [applause] >> thank you very much. good evening. a pleasure to talk to you today about william f. buckley, and maybe most speakers don't begin by telling you their political affiliation, but i think that that's important and necessary. i happen to be a liberal, and i know i'm speaking about conservative icon and a figure that is beloved to mi
from carl in elizabeth, new jersey. carl you are on booktv. please go ahead. >> thank you peter. this is a great privilege. mr. smith's book on eisenhower i got at the library and i am the middle of drafting a letter to david and his father. now that i see the two eisenhower's onstage together, it's going to have a third addressee, mrs. eisenhower as well. i have a -- i also want to say my earliest political memory is my mother saying general eisenhower was nominated at the 52 republican convention so that gives away what my age might be but i have a serious question concerning how history is recorded regarding the incident of may 1, 1960 and i have reference to mmo of general who was in a two president eisenhower. after checking with the present i informed mr. bissell of the cia that the u2 makar pressure may be undertaken provided it is carried out prior to may 1. that memo and less is written to cover general goodpaster -- suggests that the u2 might not have been authorized by a president president eisenhower but in fact would would have bea rogue operation directed by the di
, and they adopted the sat. the sat had been developed by a man named carl brigham with--working with other people carl brigham was one of the psychologists who created the group iq test. he also wrote one of the most infamous racist books--i think it was called a "study of american intelligence"--in which he warned the american people, after world war i, looking at these iq test results, that the nation would be in grave danger if it didn't stop immigration because the people flowing into the us in large numbers from europe were--had the lowest iqs and that it was going to be a serious threat to the future of the nation. brigham's work was widely reported at the time, and it took him several years before he wrote a tiny article saying, 'i think i may have been wrong'; that it may have been a mistake to do--make the huge leaps he had and to use the iq test scores the way he had. but by then, the congress had passed immigration restriction, and by then--this was by the late '20s--he was working for the college board developing the sat. and the college board, which is this group of colleges which ha
a game, looks a little selfish, but that drives our economy. carl marx said it was gambling, and we should shut it down, worse than that, worse than that, but after years of experimenting with that people think, well, maybe we have to let people indulge in these feelings, and so they -- okay -- so let me move. i have another -- another 10-15 minutes. i wanted to talk about the future and about some of the ideas that i talk about. i'm going to start from tomorrow, and then move a little bit more and more into the wild future. what happens tomorrow is president obama has said that he be sign the jobs act. that name is a little bit misleading, maybe for political reasons. it's not about jobs. it's called jump start our business startups. that spells jobs. [laughter] what it is is it's controversial. i like it, though. notably, as an experiment, it may or may not work well. i'll tell you the most interesting part of the jobs act. the jobs act was created in response to requests from internet website providers who wanted to create a crowd funding website for entrepreneurs. if you're tryi
to talk to me. and his name is carl marble, and he had some wonderful stories. you'll see in the book his role in the crossing the line ceremony, it's an ancient native custom about crossing the equator. he was cast as the royal princess for king neptune's royal court -- [laughter] because, and get this, he said, i was 19 years old, and i had the best legs of anybody aboard the ship. [laughter] some of the -- thank you. some of the other folks who gave me what they call a deck plate look at the operation included barney barnhill who, sadly, is no longer with us, but he was the 19-year-old bugler who sounded general quarters and sent enterprise to war on the morning of december 7, 1941. and when i talked to barney, he said, you know, i still have the bugle, and i wonder what i should do with it. well, i hope that it's gone to a suitable museum where it can be placed on display. another one of my excellent contacts was bill norberg back in north carolina. bill's a very impress e individual. -- impressive individual. he took to heart his advice from a succession of the ship's captains and we
boston globe." he is here to discuss his latest book, "buckley." please join me in welcoming carl bogus. [applause] >> thank you very much. good evening. pleasure to talk to you today about william f. buckley, and maybe most speakers don't begin by telling you their political affiliation, but i think that that's important and necessary. i have to be a liberal, and i know i'm speaking about a conservative icon, and the figure who is beloved by millions of people. so i think it's important that i confess my apostasy first to i happen to admire buckley tremendously, and many, many ways, but i also disagree with many of his ideas and that may come through. but i wanted to be up front with you about that. historians debate whether history is made by individuals or by structural forces. if george washington happened to have lived, or james madison, or abraham lincoln, would united states exist? if it did exist would be the same country we know to be? what other people have, thought, fill the shoes and done what they did, or would things be markedly different? for our purposes tonight, the que
-- >> yes. >> and the americans came in and said they're in charge. particularly carl johnson from the cdc. >> yeah. >> and you found african colleagues to collaborate with and fellow belgians, particularly some who came a little bit later after you'd been there a while. tell me about what you learned in '76 that guided you forward about international cooperation. >> yeah. one, i discovered that where i came from the media had both financially and technically were far inferior to what was available here in the u.s. and whereas i recemented that, we had ice -- resented that. we had isolated the virus for the first time, and the folks from cdc came and said we're taking over, and so i resented that. that's absolutely true. and then i saw i could learn so much. and someone like joe bremmen who elucidated me in epidemiology, and i'm really still grateful for him. it was not only the u.s., but there were -- it's like in some of these jokes. i mean, there was a frenchman and a south african and a brit and a belgian and an american and then some congolese in a plane, and what happened? what do yo
it this weekend. and i would've never made. carl smith probably neither one of us would have made it. but here's the average sat score for a college graduate applying for the marine corps. sat score is 1250, 3.22 gpa. no felonies. i mean none of that kind of stuff. no nasty tattoos that are visible, which is difficult in today's society. and you are heavily involved in sports and heavily involved in extracurricular activity. so 3.2 to gpa -- i sat score of 1250, just to make the cut. and then you sit around and start talking about okay then, i mean, i've looked at a record this weekend that had an sat score of 1550. i didn't even know it went that high. that's twice as high as carl smith and mind. so now if you said i want to be a young enlisted marine, i don't want to go through that sat and college and stuff, eight months. you sign up today, if you walk, go to the recruiter downtown washington, d.c. and you sign up, assuming you are morally, physically and everything else qualified, then you're looking to sit in will recall -- because we don't have room for you. it will be eight months befor
have been very difficult. >> host: well, the first call for our guests comes from carl in elizabeth, new jersey. carl, you're on booktv. please, go ahead. >> caller: thank you, peter. this is a great privilege. just a week ago i got mr. smith's book on eisenhower out of the local library, and i'm absorbed in it, and i've also, i'm in the middle of drafting a letter to david and to his father. and now that i see the two eisenhowers on stage together, it's going to have a third addressee, ms. eisenhower as well. i have a specific -- i also want to say that my earliest political memory is my mother weeping when general eisenhower was nominated at the '52 republican convention, so that gives away what my age might be, but i have a serious question concerning how history is recorded regarding the u2 incident of may 1, 1960. and i have reference to a memo of general goodpastor who was an aide to president eisenhower writing that after checking with the president i informed mr. bissell of the cia that one additional operation, a u2 operation, may be undertaken provided it is carried out pr
originally scheduled to ride that was carl sagan. he had been asked to contribute a chapter on cosmic discovery to that volume. he died in 1996. my name was put up as one who would then write in his stead. that is pretty much what i could pump out in the month. this chapter was asked to be 10,000 words. so i was almost declining. then i said no, maybe i can do something different, little a little bit more creative. and i thought, okay, why not think of discovery, not in the 20th century, not even in terms of a discovery of objects and places, but the discovery of ideas. and i would track the transition from the discovery of places going up to the errol of the great explorers once you have mapped the whole earth, what is left there for you to discover. philosophically, what is left once you know that the whole earth is there. then you have new ideas and they take you to space. and i thought to myself at the time, you know, i really want to go to mars. with people. it is an uncommon vi among my colleagues, my astrophysics colleagues, by and large, maybe three to one ratio. sending human
party has done is to merge to the right instead of george of the bush, carl rove, john mccain. let's reach out to hispanics and make immigration reform something beefier. a party where mitt romney now embodies the party. he promised to veto. he is on a radical policy prescription. the idea of making life so miserable year that immigrants are literally purge from the country. so this looks to the right has hit badly with hispanics. that means as you point out in your paper the southwest is out of reach with of, in large part because of this. they pulled out of the mexico. they have a shot in common and nevada. the hispanic and strategy, their on the strategy has been let's talk about the economy. the cuban americans in poor regions and help that we can peel off enough of them because maybe that will be that trick. the problem is that even in florida of the hispanic election as chased by significantly. the fastest growing group of the non cuban on prairie can let american immigrants for whom emigration is a defining issue . roughly one-third. and so i suspect that he is going to have
've got our friend, carl rove and his status crossroads of america putting in millions of dollars. but i'm getting at is it's handful of people, maybe six to eight people who will spend more money on this election than all of organized labor and i would say over 100 million americans. they won't put that kind of money in this election and i think people like to say, is that good for the country? is that what our forefathers saw that a handful of people, six to eight people couldn't put more money in an election and control events more than maybe 100 million people that work with their hands every day, the 13 million people and families in the labor movement and the other people not in labor movement that are out there working every day and doing the hard work. there's something wrong with that and that goes back to citizens united is citizens united was the worst thing that ever happened to this country right now. it's upsetting the balance and democracy. i think obama is going to win, but what does this pertain for the future? eventually they get richer and richer and more money goes in
. buchanan, had he been a little bit more forward. >> host: we have carl from elizabeth, new jersey. >> caller: thank you, peter. i just want to say that there aren't a lot of people in this world that can fill the shoes of brian lamb and you. you to do a magnificent job. in keeping level, asking points, not inserting yourself overly in the conversation. but bringing out the best. >> host: both proud sons of indiana, to. >> caller: it is a privilege to be able to speak to michael beschloss. i've been a fan for decades, and i think the last person i was actually able to talk to on the program was edwin meese. >> guest: we are two peas in a pod. >> caller: in reference to michael's second book, "mayday", i don't have the book is for in front of me, although it is in my collection -- where he relates to a conversation that he had with president eisenhower's son, john eisenhower, who was a close aide to the president. during the incident, which is the focus of that book. i was hoping that michael beschloss might be able to pay a picture of the order that president eisenhower gave to the
more intense than it would have been had buchanan been more forward. >> host: carl, you are on with michael beschloss. >> caller: i just want to say there aren't a lot of people in this world that could fill the shoes of brian lamb and you do a magnificent job keeping level and asking pointed questions and not in searching yourself overly in the conversation but bringing out the best. >> guest: both proud sons of indiana too. >> caller: a privilege to speak to michael beschloss. i have been a c-span and for decades and the last person i was able to talk to on a program was edwin meese. that makes me pretty far back. i have reference to michael's second book "mayday: eisenhower, khrushchev and the u-2 affair". i believe it is on page 10. i don't have the book in front of me but it is in my collection where he relates a conversation that he had with president eisenhower's son john was a close aide to the president during the incident -- that is the focus of that book. i was hoping michael beschloss might be able for the viewers to paint a picture of the order president eis
with american sign ties, and the americans came in saying we're in charge. >> yeah. >> particularly carl johnson from the cdc. >> yes. >> and you found african colleagues to collaborate with and fellow belgiums, came a little bit later after you had been there awhile. tell me what you learned in 1976 that guided you forward about international cooperation. >> yeah. when i discovered that where i came from, the means we had both financially and technically, were far inferior to what was, you know, available here in the u.s., and whereas i resented that, indeed, you know, we had isolated the virus for the first timing and the folks from cdc came and said we're taking over. i resented that. that's absolutely true. then i saw i could learn so much, and joel brennan who really initiated me into the field of epidemiology, and i'm really still grateful for him, and it was not only the u.s., but it was like in some of the jobs, there's a frenchman and a south african and a brit and a belgium and an american, and then some congoes in a plan. the power of coming up with different perspectives i found so f
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)